Canadian Landlords: Rent Increase Guidelines 2019 all Provinces

Many Canadian Provinces have regulated Rent Increase
Many Canadian Provinces have regulated Rent Increase

In Canada, each provincial rent regulators come out with rent increase guidelines yearly in the latter half of the previous year. Which is to allow the landlord to give sufficient notice period to increase the rent. These guidelines stipulate, at what rate, the landlord can increase the rent if the rent increase is regulated.

Along with the Rent Increase Guidelines 2019, this article also provides information about the name of the legislation concerning rent increase and the provincial website address to get more information for reader’s help.

Rent Increase Guidelines 2019 and Notice Period

Alberta

There is no limit in place on how much can a landlord increase rent in Alberta. The landlord can increase the rent once after every 12 months. If the tenancy is weekly, the minimum notice period is 12 tenancy weeks. in case of monthly tenancy, it’s 3 tenancy months.

  • Legislation: Residential Tenancies Act (RTA Handbook)
  • Landlord-tenant Issue Help Website
  • Contact Phone # 1-877-427-4088 Edmonton and Area # 780-427-4088

British Columbia

The Rent Increase Guidelines 2019 allows the rent to be increased by 2.5% in BC. The landlord needs to give a minimum of 3 months notice and use the government approved a form for the notice.

Manitoba

The landlord can increase the rent by 2.2%. The minimum of 3 months of notice is required before the rent increase takes effect.

Related article: Yearly Rent Increase is The Must Thing for Landlording Success, Why?

New Brunswick

There is no rent control in New Brunswick. The landlord can increase the rent by any amount, he or she see suitable. The tenant has the right to accept that or disagree, in which case can come out of tenancy. The landlord is required to give a written notice with stipulated notice period. If the tenant disagrees and wants to leave, the tenant also should give proper written notice to end the lease as per the regulation. Please click here for more info.

New Foundland and Labrador

There is no rent control in Newfoundland and Labrador. However, there are some regulations in place to the procedure of rent increase. The landlord must provide 3 months notice for the rent increase. Can not increase rent in fixed-term tenancy. Please Click Here for more info

  • Legislation: Residential Tenancies Act
  • Landlord-tenant Issue Help Website
  • Contact Phone # 1-877-829-2608

Nova Scotia

No rent control in place in Nova Scotia. For month-by-month and yearly tenancy, the landlord has to give 4 months notice. For weekly tenancy, this notice period is 2 months. Please click here for more info.

  • Legislation: Residential Tenancies Act
  • Landlord-tenant Issue Help Website
  • Contact Phone #

Ontario

As per Rent Increase Guidelines 2019, the landlord can increase the rent by 1.8%. The notice should be given by the stipulated rent increase notice form N1. The 90 days notice period is required before the landlord can increase the rent.

  • Legislation: Residential Tenancies Act
  • Ontario Rent Increase Notice Form N1
    Ontario Rent Increase Notice Form N1

    Landlord-tenant Issue Help: Website

  • Contact Phone #: 1-888-332-3234

Prince Edward Island

The legal rent increase would be 2.0% for oil and natural gas heated premises, 1.75% for electrically heated premises and 1.5% for unheated premises for the year 2019. The notice period is 3 months. More info

Quebec

In Quebec, a landlord can ask a rent increase that he thinks just and reasonable in his notice. The tenant has the right to accept or to refuse that increase within one month following the receipt of the landlord’s notice. The tenant may disagree and has the right to end the tenancy.

  • Legislation: Residential Tenancies Act
  • Landlord-tenant Issue Help Régie du Logement
  • Contact Phone #1 800 683-2245 Montréal, Laval and Longueuil # 514 873-2245

Saskatchewan

There is no limit on how much can a landlord increase rent in Saskatchewan.

  • Legislation: Residential Tenancies Act
  • Landlord-tenant Issue Help Website
  • Contact Phone # 1 888 215 2222

I hope above information is helpful to you. Please share your concern or questions in the comment section.

Happy Landlording!

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here